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Topher37

Transmission fluid

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I have a 2011 dodge journey 3.6 and want to know how to change the transmission fluid. I am boggled why I can not find where the drain plug or filler is.

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No drain or filler plug. Trans service is supposed to be a dealer only service. If you want to do it yourself, you will have to drop the pan and make sure you add the exact amount back in since there is no way to measure it with a dipstick.

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Ok, thanks for replying. Guess it's off to the dealer

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I'm in the same boat as you...just hit 83k miles and figured I'll be doing the transmission flush soon. Will probably cost $200 or so at the dealer. I hate to take it to the dealer since I do all of my own maintenance...but looks like I'll have to this time around!

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My guess it's more than $200. Had a minivan in the dealer about 8 years ago for a trans service. Close to $500.

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no reason to go to the dealer if you dont want to my last fluid and filter change with my reg mech. was 125. i don't do flushes as i heard different stores so i just stick with the reg filter and fluid.. and to be honest it has been about 6 yrs ago when i had the last one done. i just called a dodge dealer and he said $199. and that was for a trans flush. so i asked about doing spark plugs and they quoted $289. for the 3.6 engine

Edited by 2late4u

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I have a 2010 Town and Country with the same 62te transmission. I had the transmission fluid changed for $140, taxes and shop fees included (had a dealer coupon). The only "reason" you can't get the fluid level correct without going to a dealer is because the level on the dealer dipstick is based on the current temperature of the transmission.

The pan needs to be dropped, there is a filter that gets replaced, and the gasket is made with RTV. If you can get the cost down to $140, it's not much more than the cost of doing it yourself (and has the added advantage of being documented, and on someone else's dime if it's been done incorrectly).

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no reason to go to the dealer if you dont want to my last fluid and filter change with my reg mech. was 125. i don't do flushes as i heard different stores so i just stick with the reg filter and fluid.. and to be honest it has been about 6 yrs ago when i had the last one done. i just called a dodge dealer and he said $199. and that was for a trans flush. so i asked about doing spark plugs and they quoted $289. for the 3.6 engine

I have a 2010 Town and Country with the same 62te transmission. I had the transmission fluid changed for $140, taxes and shop fees included (had a dealer coupon). The only "reason" you can't get the fluid level correct without going to a dealer is because the level on the dealer dipstick is based on the current temperature of the transmission.

The pan needs to be dropped, there is a filter that gets replaced, and the gasket is made with RTV. If you can get the cost down to $140, it's not much more than the cost of doing it yourself (and has the added advantage of being documented, and on someone else's dime if it's been done incorrectly).

Great info guys, thanks! Looks like I'll avoid a full flush then (which probably costs more anyways). Just ask for a drain, filter change, and refill then? What fluid did you guys go with? Just the standard mopar transmission fluid, or did you upgrade to synthetic or anything?

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My guess it's more than $200. Had a minivan in the dealer about 8 years ago for a trans service. Close to $500.

You had to have had other work done to tally up to $500! There's no way just a trans drain or flush cost that much!

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You had to have had other work done to tally up to $500! There's no way just a trans drain or flush cost that much!

You are correct. My bad. It was a 60,000 mile complete service which included trans service. My bad. Hey, it was really almost 10 years ago.....I have CRS disease!

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id stick to the manufacture mopar fluid so they cant say you voided your powertrain warranty

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Great info guys, thanks! Looks like I'll avoid a full flush then (which probably costs more anyways). Just ask for a drain, filter change, and refill then? What fluid did you guys go with? Just the standard mopar transmission fluid, or did you upgrade to synthetic or anything?

Mine was done at the dealer - they used Mopar ATF+4 and a Mopar filter. ATF+4 is already a synthetic lubricant. It's also $8/quart. The total cost of parts to do a drain and filter change is about $110 (8 bottles of fluid, plus a $30 filter, plus applicable taxes). The 62te should not be "flushed," ever. Just a drain and fill with filter change. When done at the appropriate interval, you shouldn't have problems. Having the dealer do it eliminates any headaches you'd ever have, just make sure you get a good discount on them actually performing the service.

For a dealer to do it, it's really about 30-40 minutes of actual work, most of which is cleaning the RTV off the mating surfaces. The only reason you "can't" do it at home is that you don't necessarily know the temperature of the transmission fluid. Though, if your EVIC tells you what the transmission temp is (as my 2015 does), then the only thing you need is the correct dip stick (which can be found for the minivan platform with the 62te, and I'd imagine the fluid level is the same, but I don't work for a dealer, so I don't know for a fact).

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Mine was done at the dealer - they used Mopar ATF+4 and a Mopar filter. ATF+4 is already a synthetic lubricant. It's also $8/quart. The total cost of parts to do a drain and filter change is about $110 (8 bottles of fluid, plus a $30 filter, plus applicable taxes). The 62te should not be "flushed," ever. Just a drain and fill with filter change. When done at the appropriate interval, you shouldn't have problems. Having the dealer do it eliminates any headaches you'd ever have, just make sure you get a good discount on them actually performing the service.

For a dealer to do it, it's really about 30-40 minutes of actual work, most of which is cleaning the RTV off the mating surfaces. The only reason you "can't" do it at home is that you don't necessarily know the temperature of the transmission fluid. Though, if your EVIC tells you what the transmission temp is (as my 2015 does), then the only thing you need is the correct dip stick (which can be found for the minivan platform with the 62te, and I'd imagine the fluid level is the same, but I don't work for a dealer, so I don't know for a fact).

Good info, thanks man. I bet the dealer pays about 1/4 that price for the parts though...but at $150 it is a decent deal to get the service done. I will definitely do just the drain and refill, no flush.

I don't think there is any dipstick on our DJ to check transmission fluid level. Don't the just pump in the correct amount of fluid and call it good?

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Good info, thanks man. I bet the dealer pays about 1/4 that price for the parts though...but at $150 it is a decent deal to get the service done. I will definitely do just the drain and refill, no flush.

I don't think there is any dipstick on our DJ to check transmission fluid level. Don't the just pump in the correct amount of fluid and call it good?

The dealer has the correct tool (I don't remember the part number). The easiest thing to do is take a wire coat hangar, straighten it, and mark it for the correct level (this assumes you know what those dimensions are). This is the actual recommendation for the 2008-2012 T&C/GC in the Haynes manual. I don't know what the level is for the DJ, so I wouldn't use that as a reference without confirming the measurements first. It's the same transmission and engine, so you'd think it would be close, but you never know.

Alternatively, if you can get a dealer to read the level, then you can get a test case for full and hot, and then you only need to get it to that point. Without a proper service manual, it's a lot of guess work. Transmissions are not something to guess with.

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Just measure before you do the fluid change. And mark that level on your stick as a baseline

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I'm still hoping for a Youtube how-to on this but I think I'll have it done by the dealer.....seems like a real pain to do.

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Fluid And Filter Service

FLUID AND FILTER SERVICE

FLUID/FILTER SERVICE (RECOMMENDED)

NOTE

Refer to the maintenance schedules in LUBRICATION and MAINTENANCE, or the vehicle owner's manual, for the recommended maintenance (fluid/filter change) intervals for this transaxle.

NOTE

Only fluids of the type labeled MOPAR® ATF+4 should be used. A filter change should be made at the time of the transmission oil change. The magnet (on the inside of the oil pan) should also be cleaned with a clean, dry cloth.

NOTE

If the transaxle is disassembled for any reason, the fluid and filter should be changed.

  1. Raise vehicle on a hoist. Refer to LUBRICATION and MAINTENANCE for proper procedures. Place a drain container with a large opening, under transaxle oil pan.

  2. Loosen pan bolts and tap the pan at one corner to break it loose allowing fluid to drain, then remove the oil pan.

Remove nuts at the oil filter.

Install a new filter and nuts, tighten to 5 N·m (40 in. lbs.).

Install the fluid filter oil pan, use a bead of MOPAR® ATF RTV (MS-GF41).

Clean the oil pan and magnet. Reinstall pan using new MOPAR® Silicone Adhesive sealant. Tighten oil pan bolts to 12 N·m (105 in. lbs.).

Pour four Quarts of MOPAR® ATF+4 through the dipstick opening.

Start engine and allow to idle for at least one minute. Then, with parking and service brakes applied, move selector lever momentarily to each position, ending in the park or neutral position.

Check the transaxle fluid level and add an appropriate amount to bring the transaxle fluid level to 3 mm (1/8 in.) below the lowest mark on the dipstick.

Recheck the fluid level after the transaxle has reached normal operating temperature 82° C (180°F). Refer to Fluid Level and Condition Check for the proper fluid fill

Fluid Level And Condition Check

FLUID LEVEL AND CONDITION CHECK

FLUID LEVEL CHECK USING THE SCAN TOOL

GUID-21-051-060-66089.gif

TEMP CHART

Click to Enlarge

  1. Verify that the vehicle is parked on a level surface.

  2. Remove the dipstick tube cap.

    WARNING

    There is a risk of accident from vehicle moving when the engine is running. Secure vehicle to prevent it from moving. There is a risk of injury from contusions and burns if you insert your hands into the engine when it is running. Do not touch hot or rotating parts. Wear properly fitted work clothes.

Actuate the service brake. Start engine and let it run at idle speed in selector lever position "P".

Shift through the transmission modes several times with the vehicle stationary and the engine idling.

NOTE

When inserting dipstick special tool Dipstick, excess insertion force may cause the dipstick to slip past the stop on the bracket in the transmission oil pan. An approximate distance that the dipstick sould be inserted into the fill tube is 424 mm (16.69 in.).

Warm up the transmission, wait at least 2 minutes and check the oil level with the engine running. Push the Oil Dipstick

GUID-21-038-000-3379752.gif

Dipstick

into transmission fill tube until the dipstick tip contacts the oil pan and pull out again, read off oil level, repeat if necessary.

NOTE

The dipstick will protrude from the fill tube when installed.

Check transmission oil temperature using the appropriate scan tool.

The transmission Oil Dipstick

GUID-21-038-000-3379752.gif

Dipstick

has indicator marks every 10 mm. Determine the height of the oil level on the dipstick and using the height, the Transmission Fluid Temperature (TFT) as viewed with the scan too, and the Transmission Fluid Graph, determine if the transmission oil level is correct.

Add or remove oil as necessary and recheck the oil level.

Once the oil level is correct, install the dipstick tube cap.

FLUID CONDITION

Along with fluid level, it is important to check the condition of the fluid. When the fluid smells burned, and is contaminated with metal or friction material particles, a complete transaxle recondition is probably required. Be sure to examine the fluid on the dipstick closely. If there is any doubt about its condition, drain out a sample for a double check.

MOPAR® ATF+4 (Automatic Transmission Fluid) when new is red in color. The ATF is dyed red so it can be identified from other fluids used in the vehicle such as engine oil or antifreeze. The red color is not permanent and is not an indicator of fluid condition. As the vehicle is driven, the ATF will begin to look darker in color and may eventually become brown. This is normal. ATF+4

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Good post! Looks easy enough to do, would just need to order the special dip stick tool to check for levels.

But for ease of service, I think I'll take my vehicle to the dealer; even though I hate to do it!

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I'll do a lot of maintenance on my vehicles. The 62te drain and fill is one I don't particularly feel like doing myself. Reason 1 is the warranty coverage - it's an expensive component to have to repair, and I don't feel like dealing with questions as to whether or not it was done correctly. Reason 2 is that the hassle involved with draining that particular transmission (since there is no drain bolt), refilling it, and making sure it's done just right, is worth the extra $30 to pay someone else to do it.

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I'll do a lot of maintenance on my vehicles. The 62te drain and fill is one I don't particularly feel like doing myself. Reason 1 is the warranty coverage - it's an expensive component to have to repair, and I don't feel like dealing with questions as to whether or not it was done correctly. Reason 2 is that the hassle involved with draining that particular transmission (since there is no drain bolt), refilling it, and making sure it's done just right, is worth the extra $30 to pay someone else to do it.

Your right there is no drain bolt but once you drop the pan you could install one for future use.

Edited by Journey_SeXT

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To follow up to Journey_SeXT:

The dipstick can be made at home with the following items:

1 wire hangar

duct tape

some marking tool (file, knife, whatever)

Straighten the hangar - you need something more than 18 inches in length (so you drop it into the fill tube). Measure 424mm from one end, and mark this off (use the duct tape). Everything below that point will go into the filler tube (marked with the "Dealer Only" cap). Use the chart Journey_SeXT posted and mark your min/max levels.

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Any garage can change the filter and fluid, you can also there is no drain plug so you drop the pan change the filter also

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