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Black Diamond

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  1. Will these wheels fit 19 fit? I have 2018 SE

    Agree with JK. Here's one calculator you can use: https://www.discounttire.com/learn/tire-size-calculator
  2. Good Evening Journeyers! Since I came back to the site, I discovered I never provided an update regarding my bluetooth issue. I was told by the dealership that it's the module and that it needed to be replaced. My DJ is long out of any warranties. I was quoted $800 for the dealership to fix it. I have not had it fixed as of yet due to other mechanical issues from my DJ (and about three other vehicles) that needed to be done. Also, I was told that they would have to do an update to the Uconnect and a reflash as well.
  3. Will these wheels fit 19 fit? I have 2018 SE

    2late4u, I went through changing rims on my 2011 DJ Crew 3 years ago and it was a process. I don't know about now but back then because of the oddball rim size, replacing the tires was very expensive due to the limited choice and availabilty of 19 inch tires. Also, because of the bolt pattern rimm selections that actually fit were limited as well. I started with going down to 18's but eventually went up to 20's as the variety of rim selections were greater. There were more selections with the 18's and 20's regarding tires than 19's as well. The link below tells of my experience: https://www.dodgejourneyforum.com/topic/7756-my-20s-on-my-2011-dodge-journey-crew-experience/ I'm still running the same Lexani CSS8 20's on my DJ. Hate they discontined them!
  4. My 20's on My 2011 Dodge Journey Crew Experience

    Good Afternoon Journeyers!! It's been a long time since I posted here. Not to beat a dead horse (really not the intent) but I wanted to provide a response to Steve T and SeanTacular. The information I presented is correct. I will add that the style (or "Face Style") and backspacing determines how close the spokes hit the calipers which still based mostly by the offset. Also, the tire size width (265 45 20) did rub however it was not the caliper that it rubbed it was the fenderwell. Once I went with 245 45 20 tires, no rubbing of the fenderwell occurred. I can only say this for the 2011 Dodge Journey and it's based upon my experience and talking with difference companies (along with internet research). As I mentioned, others experience may vary. For example, the Helo 875 rims had a 38mm offset and they rubbed the brake calipers (it was slight but over time it became an issue. The Lexani CSS-8 rims with the 40 mm +offset do not rub the calipers at all because they are 40 mm +offset and have a flat Face Style like the OEM 19 inch rims that originally came with my Journey. https://www.msawheels.com/blog/wheel-offset-explained/ Here's a pic of the 19 inch OEM Rim I had when I bought my Journey (this pic is not my vehicle however I did have the Khumo tires and rims): Here's a pic of the type of rim I had after getting rid of the OEM 19 inch rims. This is a 38mm +offset rim (Helo 875 as mentioned in my initial post) The Helo's rubbed the calipers. Here's a pic of the type of rim I have now which is a 40 mm +offset (Lexani CSS-8 as mentioned in my initial post):
  5. Black Diamond

  6. redtomatoman and dhh3, I tried both of the methods just now and it's still doing the same thing. BD
  7. Good Evening Journeyers! My Phone button on my radio has stopped working. I have the 8.4 without the Navigation System but the system is the Alpine System. When I press the button, it does the beep sound but no menu comes up. My phone has always been paired. As far as I know, I tried the update solution following the steps to update it but it did nothing. I talked to my Dodge Dealership and they want to charge me $120 just to diagnose and see what the problem is. Has anyone experienced this issue before and if so how was it solved? BD
  8. My 20's on My 2011 Dodge Journey Crew Experience

    Halfnutz67, glad to help! I wanted people here to know the information so that they won't have to go through the same things I did. Dhh3, the ride is great! No issues! Lobitz68, you are correct. B4Zinga, what you have mentioned in not entirely correct. The tire size had nothing to do with the rim rubbing...it was the size of the tire as they were too wide. When it comes to wheels, it all has to do with the design face of the wheel which determines the offset. A 35 mm offset rim will never be more tucked in than a 25 mm offset rim. The offset of a wheel is the distance from it's hub mounting surface to the centerline of the wheel. As mentioned by others including myself, the OEM Rims are 40 mm offset. This has been verified by Dodge. If you get a 30 mm offset riim, they will not fit. I can say this for certain not just because of the numbers formula but because my very first set of rims I tried was some 18 inch Vision Warrior 375 wheels with a 25 mm offset. They rubbed the OEM brake calipers during the test fit. The pads and rotors are above factory specs as the OEM brake pads are much smaller which is why most Journeyers that have a 2011 (I cannot account for other years) went through two sets of brake pads before reaching 50,000 miles. Getting the bigger brake pads and upgraded rotors will help in increasing brake life and achieving better stopping power. The issue was not in me getting bigger brake pads...it was getting smaller offset wheels. Although 22's can go on the Journey, 20's work better for my taste, ride, and treadlife. Going to a 22 will cause one to feel even more of the road as there is much less tire (the bigger the wheel the thinner the tire...unless it's off road tires on an off-road vehicle which is a different matter) and can actually decrease the life of your struts and suspension unless one is going to upgrade those items to account for the 22's hence the old adage of "Just because one can doesn't mean that one should." Positive Offset (1-40 and up)- The Hub mounting surface is toward the front or wheel side of the wheel. Positive numbers are ascending (increase, go up) and the more positive the rim, the more the design face of the rim faces the street. Zero Offset (0)- The hub mounting surface is even the centerline (center) of the wheel. The design face of the rim at this point is centerline or in the middle between the street side and brake side. Negative Offset (-1 to -40 and below)- The hub mounting surface is toward the back or brake side of the wheel's centerline. Deep Dish Rims typically have a negative offset. In this case, the design face of the rim is no longer centerline but pushed in more toward the brake side. The best way I've been able to learn this is with basic geometry: to the left is positive, the middle is zero, and the right is negative. Wheel _______________ [ ] [ ] Street [ ] Brake [ ] [ ] [______________ ] Wheel 40+ 30+ 20+ 10+ <---------0----------> -10 -20 -30 -40 (Street/Roadside) (Centerline) (Brake Side) BD
  9. Good Evening Journeyers!! It's been a long time since I posted here. As a result of an IM I received from hafnutz67, the experience I'm going to talk about is a shortened version to cover a period of a year and half. About a year and a half ago I replaced my 19 inch rims with some 20 inch Rims. The Rims were the Helo HE875 which by all accounts were stated to fit. The reason at the time was that I wanted some black and chrome rims to match my black and chrome look. I also did not want to pay $250 for each tire at a minimum because of the oddball 19 inch tires size. I started hearing some noise so after taking it to Pep Boys, my brakes, including the rotor were replaced with upgraded brakes including bigger pads. At that time it was determined that the calipers were rubbing against the spokes of the riims. They sawed down the caliper some and the noise seemed to go away. Then, it came back again. I talked to the place where I got the rims from and it was determined that they were rubbing the caliper. I tried out some other rims and each one upon arrival (after doing the test fit) rubbed the caliper. I then did some research on rims and offsets and found out a lot of information which helped me find the rims that I have now. Here is some to help everyone here. Keep in mind that I am not a mechanic, DIY, or ASE Certified...I'm just a Journey Owner who is a consumer that went through pure Hades and just came out of it as a result of research and trial and error. 1. Know the offset of the OEM Rims which in the case of the Crew Rims, they are 40mm. Since the Helo HE875 are 38 mm offset, it's a good chance they will not fit. If you base the fit solely upon what a website, magazine, or tire place tells you, you can be prone to erroneous information. Yes, you can see Visualizers that show what the rims will look like on the Journey but that does not mean that they will fit. 2. When it comes to offsets, the easiest way to know is that the more the design (face) of the rim sits on top of the rim (more forward), the more positive the offset. Positive offset will push the design face of the rim more towards the street. The less the offset, or more towards 0 or past 0 to negative, the more the design face of the rim is pushed towards the brakes (inward). When it's 0, it's pretty a "deep dish" rim where the design face is truly pushed in and there's more "outside rim" to wipe around inside. 3. Our bolt pattern, 5x1275 lug 5 inch or 127mm is a very hard bolt pattern to find aftermarket rims that will fit on the Journey. There is very little selection in this bolt pattern. Our Journey require a High Positive Offset as mentioned in Number #1. 4. Do not try or let anyone tell you to use spacers to account for lower offset, 0 offset, or negative offset wheels. This will cause problems no matter how little spacing is used. 5. When you get bigger pads, they will push the caliper out towards the spokes of the rim. Usually, one can get bigger pads and not have the calipers rub the spokes or a part of the bore on the OEM wheels but there can be some exceptions. It's best to try to get the bigger pads with the OEM Rims first before getting another set of rims because in case that there is a caliper issue, you still have your OEM's to fall back on. 6. Know that when going with larger rims that your tire size and treadlife will be affected. For example, if you are used to getting 70,000 mile tires, they will be almost nonexistent in 20's or above. My Falken Pro G4 A/S that I have right now (245 45 20) are 45,000 miles treadlife at $140 each without road hazard plans, replacement plans and taxes. For 60,000 miles, the tires can run from $200 to $250 each without road hazard plans, taxes and replacement plans. Also the larger the rim, the lower the profile as well. Lower profile tires tend to have less treadlife but this is not ironclad. Lower profile tires will also make the ride stiffer as the usual "cush" starts to less in existence and feel which means you will feel every bump and nuance in the road including vibration. This will have nothing to do with the suspension....it's more of the "rim" is making contact with the road and there is less "tire" to absorb it. 7. Know that with a wider tire, rubbing can happen. My first set of 20 inch tires were 265 45 20. They started rubbing a little so I went down to 245 45 20 and they have worked out fine. I have not tried the 255 range so I will assume that the 245 would be the recommended max unless your going with a 255 40 20. 8. Form follows function. In my case, the Helo HE875 are a PITA (Pain In The ....) to take off. This is because this rim has an insert that has to be completely taken off with an allen wrench before you can get to the bolts of the rim. This insert sits on top of the rim and each spoke has it's own screw. Since the rim has ten spokes, that's ten screws on each wheel that have to be unscrewed just to take off the insert BEFORE you can take off the 5 bolts to get the wheel off. When looking for rims, don't go just by the look alone...also figure how labor intensive they will be to take off. Everything that looks good is not always functional hence form follows function. Yes, the Helo HE875's looked great but they were a PITA to take off and the plastic inserts crack as well especially when going through the car wash. The Rims that I have now are made by Lexani and they are 40 mm offset rims. The noise I heard was my front struts which were worn and I replaced them today. Now, I have no more noise and no more rim rubbing the brake calipers. I did the ProStop Premium Ceramic Brake Pads which are big and quiet. My only problem now is that my Bluetooth on my radio stopped working which that is a different subject. The first pic is my Journey with the Helo 875 Rims. The second pic is my Journey with the Lexani CSS8 Rims. Again, this is my experience. Your experience will vary. Mods...if this is in the wrong area I most humbly apologize. I am in this case covering wheels, tires, and brakes in one fell swoop. If this is truly help others, you have my permission to use it as a sticky, article, or whatever it's called. BD ‚Äč
  10. OEM tires bald after 18000 miles

    This is very true, jkeaton! For those that have the Khumo Solus KH16 tires that came on the Journey (2011...I can't speak for the earlier or later years), I have found out the real reason mine were worn out after 25k miles. I talked to Khumo directly and the tires that were put on the Journey at the time were made out of a different compound than the replacement tires. That compound is designed to wear our quicker than the replacement tires. This is why there are so many reports of the factory tires wearing out between 20k to 30k miles. The "warranty" on these tires are not be specified in the tires warranty as far as exact number of miles (I didn't see anything in mine when I bought it used at 24K in May 2013 and the tires at that time were close to 3/4 worn) however once I talked to Khumo after the tires wore out quickly that's when I found this out. All tire specifications (including compounds) are requested and specified by the automobile manufacturer (yes that would be Chrysler in the case of our Journeys). I'm just using my own experience to help those that may not be aware of this. If anyone still has the factory Khumo Solus KH16, it would best to contact Khumo directly just to make sure that your tires do not fall under the same category. I'm almost certain that this was the case for all 2011's that have these tires. This is nothing against Khumo because from what I hear, the replacement tires (which are not the same compound as the Chrysler factory tires that come on the vehicle new hence "OEM") are much better tires. BD
  11. Big Shoes - (Tires)

    Nice! BD
  12. My 2011 on 20's

    Updated the post with a better pic! BD
  13. My 2011 on 20's

    Edited with PIc!! This is a pic of my 2011 Journey Crew with Dubs on it. The tires are Hankook Ventus AS RH07 265-45-20. I took my 19's off as 4 tires was very expensive in the long run for me. The Hankooks at Discount Tires were $705 and the rims were $1200. Basically it was $1900 and with a discount it was $1800. My original plan was to downsize to 18's however I couldn't find any 18's in the rims that I liked and the ones I did like unfortunately were hitting the calipers after doing a wheel fit. This way, I could get the rims and tires for just about the same price as replacing 4 19 inch tires as those usually are close to or a little over $1,000.. In my case, the tires and rims for 18's would've been about $1200 however in the long run, to replace the tires is way less expensive and even in the case of the 20's, it's about $700 or less to do four tires when the times comes. Either way, the math works out favorably when downsizing to 18's or going to 20's. The ride is much smoother now! No issues in the 8 months that I have had them. No wet weather issues even during the ice storm we had here in Texas sometime back. I cannot speak for the snow as we don't get a lot of snow! For those that have the Khumo Solus KH16 tires that came on the Journey (2011...I can't speak for the earlier or later years), I have found out the real reason mine were worn out after 25k miles. I talked to Khumo directly and the tires that were put on the Journey at the time were made out of a different compound than the replacement tires. That compound is designed to wear our quicker than the replacement tires. This is why there are so many reports of the factory tires wearing out between 25k to 30k miles. The "warranty" on these tires my not be specified in the tires warranty as far as exact number of miles (I didn't see anything in mine when I bought it used at 24K in May 2013 and the tires at that time were close to 3/4 worn) however once I talked to Khumo after the tires wore out quickly that's when I found this out. All tire specifications (including compounds) are requested and specified by the automobile manufacturer (yes that would be Chrysler in the case of our Journeys). I'm not trying to tell anyone to get on Chrysler or anything...however I'm just using my own experience to help those that may not be aware of this. If anyone still has the factory Khumo Solus KH16, it would best to contact Khumo directly just to make sure that your tires do not fall under the same category. I'm almost certain that this was the case for all 2011's that have these tires. This is nothing against Khumo because from what I hear, the replacement tires (which are not the same compound as the Chrysler factory tires that come on the vehicle new) are much better tires. BD http://
  14. 17" to 19" mags & tire

    I don't have the RT Wheels but I do have my wheels from my Crew that I'm selling if you're interested. BD
  15. Rear Cargo Mat

    In my case, I use all three rows of seats in my Journey so I have not found a rear cargo mat just for the space behind the third row. It seems that most rubber mats are for behind the send row which means it would cover the third row of seats. Has anyone made a mod for this? Thanks BD
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